In Greenland, A Wildfire Has Been Burning for More Than A Week

In southwest Greenland, there has been a wildfire burning for over a week. Even though Greenland is composed of a lot of ice, the edges of the island is covered in moss and shrubs and other dry plants. This wildfire, which was has been monitored by satellite, is noteworthy for its size and duration.

This year has had more activity than any other since the satellite started recording in 2000.

While some say the fire may be human caused since the area is popular for hunters, it could also be caused by peat. Peatlands store large amounts of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and methane.

The area could also catch fire easier this year because of the low rainfall period. However, scientists do not attribute the increase to climate change, though they say that mean temperatures in Greenland have been increasing recently.

Jason Box, a climate scientist said that the fires “are not abnormal” but that the increase in shrubbery in the Arctic is a climate change related trends that provides more fuels for fires to burn.

[Via Mashable]

 

 

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